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03Feb2016

Medical Leaves and Mustard Plasters (con’t)

  • By Ian Bradley
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In my previous post, I made the point that although the family physician provides the official “time-off-work-for stress” letter, the principal decision-maker is the patient. I argued that most workers under stress debate the pro’s and con’s of setting the medical leave in motion very much like we all did as children when awakening with
14Dec2015

Medical Leaves and Muster Plasters

  • By Ian Bradley
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It’s 7 am on a rainy February day in the middle of week when I’m 10 years old and just waking up with a detectable, and if amplified, quite apparent scratchy throat.   As a university professor with a private practice in workplace psychology, that specific day is very much in the past. However, I
01Oct2012

Stress Leave (conclusion)

  • By Ian Bradley
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In in two previous posts, I described the typical sequence of events that surround a workplace leave for psychological distress.  I remarked on how the current system of handling such leaves is unsatisfying for the insuracne carrier, the employer, co-workers and most importantly, the stressed worker. I agree that the medicalization of the process with
26Oct2010

Problem-solving not Diagnosis: Part II Medical Leave

  • By Ian Bradley
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In my prior post, I described the events leading up to a medical leave obtained for psychological reason. In my experience, something strange happens when a medical leave is granted. I would argue from this time forward, the initial workplace issues fade into obscurity. These causative issues are replaced by a quasi-medical-legal examination about whether the
06Sep2010

The Lunch, Part V of Returning to Work

  • By Ian Bradley
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The return to work from a psychological disability can be harrowing, but worse yet, it can fail.  The prognosis for returning becomes worse, the longer the disability leaves continues according to an expert report. Seventy-five percent of disabled workers are able to return after 12 weeks, only two percent after one year.. http://www.mentalhealthroundtable.ca/june_2004/monitor_june2004.pdf Although not
14Aug2010

The Plan; because rest is not enough! Part IV Returning to Work

  • By Ian Bradley
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As explained in my previous posts on the topic of returning to work, the worker disabled by psychological workplace issues needs a comprehensive psychological and occupational assessment.  Often this dual assessment leads to various cognitive behavioural interventions that address the employee’s stress or depression as well as an understanding of the workplace issues that led
04Aug2010

Occupational Assessment: Part III of Returning to Work

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is another post in the series about returning to work from a psychological disability. Previously, I described some issues involved in assessing the clinical or psychological aspects of a workplace disability.  Now, we will examine the second half of the assessment, the occupational. I begin with what the Industrial Psychologist calls the KSA’s, or
25Jul2010

Clinical Assessment: Part II Returning to work

  • By Ian Bradley
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Most of my clients suffering from workplace stress or burnout have symptoms in two areas- clinical and the occupational. As a result, I have to treat the client’s psychological symptoms but I also have to understand how the factors in the workplace might have contributed to the presenting psychological symptoms.  Focusing upon just one provides
15Jul2010

Having a story: Part I of Returning to Work

  • By Ian Bradley
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People are curious.  Office romances, organizational changes, either real or imagined, vie with hockey pools as major themes of work place conversations.  High-up on this water-cool conversational list are sick leaves, especially an absence related to psychological problems. Whether it be; “There but the grace of God, go I.” or “If he’s off with stress,
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