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08Jul2020

Covid: my new sport?

  • By Ian Bradley
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I’m not sure exactly when it began, or more importantly, when it became an entrenched habit. But, for the last months, I’ve had a regular routine of looking at the daily stats concerning the pandemic.          I don’t just rely upon regular news feeds, but I go to my authoritative book-marked sites
30Apr2020

The Bee Gees are back!

  • By Ian Bradley
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Just before nodding off to sleep last night my wife turned over and asked me: “are you happy?” As with most men hearing this question, instant alarm bells went off.  With later elaboration, what she really meant was, now during this weird, self-isolating, social-distancing Covid 19 time, was I happy?   It got me thinking
20Apr2020

Developing New Habits

  • By Ian Bradley
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Good habits are great, they function like automatic algorithms that silently function in the background to help us engage in adaptive behaviour. Habits can not only propel us to good things that they do so automatically and without highly conscious and deliberate thought thus freeing our brains to do more complex things. Automatically buckling the
22Mar2020

Coping with Covid-19

  • By Ian Bradley
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I am writing this email from a required 14 day self-isolation required due to my recent Florida golfing trip.   I’ve tried to put together some of my personal thoughts while passing along some hopefully helpful information based upon psychological evidence.   Firstly, why the preoccupation with toilet paper?  Although I have only read about
16Mar2020

The world might never be the same; and maybe that’s good

  • By Ian Bradley
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In the midst of our coronavirus pandemic, it is interesting to speculate about the long-term psychological consequences of the virus and our current coping such as social distancing and hand hygiene. As a psychologist with a specialty in workplace issues, most of my observations focus on this area.   Firstly, long gone are the heroic
27Oct2019

My Own Cigarette Story

  • By Ian Bradley
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After being appointed at a relatively young age as Chief Psychologist at the large university teaching hospital in Montreal, I was inundated with myriad heavy-duty tasks such as developing a program for chronic schizophrenic patients, revamping our computerized assessment operations, developing behavioural medicine modules for various hospital departments.   However, I had one graduate student
10Jul2019

What College Preparation? A case of praxis deficiency

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I never considered my academic training to be a failure, in fact, I quite enjoyed my doctoral training in clinical psychology at a rather prestigious Canadian university. Therefore, I was somewhat taken aback when my advisers’ references were relayed to prospective employers with a “so sad that he didn’t make it into academia” tone.  
17Apr2019

Rewards at work: a cautionary tale

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I had the recent privilege of consulting to a company that specializes in employee recognition- the tangible kind of recognition where good performance is rewarded with personalized mugs, plaques or any number of concrete goodies from their expansive inventory. Their business is going well partially because many companies don’t take the time to properly evaluate
20Jan2019

Family Business Succession: conclusion

  • By Ian Bradley
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  Start Early As discussed in the previous post, most psychologists specializing in the area recommend thinking about succession as a long-term process rather than as a defined event, or worse, an anointment. Some even recommend that the process begin years before the actual succession. Ironically, long-term thinking does occur, perhaps as a father watching
13Jan2019

Family Business Succession: the dance

  • By Ian Bradley
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  Typically when I consult with family businesses thinking about succession, I first meet with the founder, then the aspiring members of the second generation – but very quickly I try to gather everyone in the same room. With the encouragement of honest but non-adversarial conversation, my hope is for both the founder and successors
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