Archives

14Jul2014

Conflict: Personal Lessons in Management,Part V

  • By Ian Bradley
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Managing a department is a bit like being a therapist. You get to see a little bit of the inner world of the people you manage, but unlike therapy, you don’t get to bill for it. I remember the first time that a senior psychologist entered my office and started to cry. It was a
21Feb2014

Managing staff: Personal Lessons in Management; Part IV

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is a continuing series in an open letter to psychologists thinking about accepting that promotion to department or service director.  In previous posts I talked about the fantasies around promotion as well as the inherent organizational conflict that comes with being a middle manager, organizational change and today, dealing with staff.   As Chief
29Jan2014

Change; Personal Lessons in Management; Part III

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is a continuing series in an open letter to psychologists thinking about accepting that promotion to department or service director. In previous posts I talked about the fantasies around promotion as well as the inherent organizational conflict that comes with being a “middle manager.”  In today’s post, I talk about change.   The skills
14Jan2014

Being in the middle: Personal lessons in management, Part II

  • By Ian Bradley
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Welcome to a series of posts directed at young psychologists thinking about becoming managers.  Although I had a successful twenty-five year tenure as Chief Psychologist, I entered the position extremely unprepared for the managerial tasks I faced.  Hopefully, sharing my experiences will help others become better managers. In my first post I addressed the topic
06Jan2014

Memo to Young Psychologists: Beware of Promotions

  • By Ian Bradley
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The call came out of the blue from the secretary of a psychiatric director of a large and prestigious teaching hospital.  The director wanted to see if I would be interested in applying for the recently vacated position of Chief Psychologist.   I had been working in a small CBT unit of what once had
29Jul2013

Never say that a test is valid, part i.

  • By Ian Bradley
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One would imagine that a part-time academic appointment such as mine with McGill University would bring certain perks such as a free gym membership or reduced rates of campus parking… alas no.  What perks exist are almost all of the intellectually stimulating variety such as when I am called upon to review research grants as
25Feb2013

“Why Work Sucks” a review

  • By Ian Bradley
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I’ve just read “Why Work Sucks” by Ressler and Thompson, the ex-Best Buyers, whose resonating book title describes their Result Only Work Environment- ROWE. For those not up on the latest business buzz, the book takes to task our underlying assumptions about time and work.  Briefly summarized here is their beginning premise: A employee  at
11Sep2012

Why do we work, and so hard?

  • By Ian Bradley
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According to a recent American Community Survey, the percentage of professionals working more than 50 hours per week has grown from 34% in 1997 to 38% in 2006.  If Aristotle saw these figures, he would say that we can’t be happy or worse, truly free. In the classic Greek tradition, the only people doing anything
25Aug2011

Working at the Beach

  • By Ian Bradley
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A senior telecom VP who came to my office for help starting a new career related the following: I was at the beach with my family and found myself doing something that for all my career I swore never to do – work.  Not only did I work, but I actually enjoyed doing it without
10Nov2010

Procedural Justice

  • By Ian Bradley
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As a reader of various scholarly journals in Occupational Psychology, I have often been struck by the seemingly amorphous nature of some of our concepts.  One clear example is the term organizational climate- a concept for which we all have an innate feel for, but a concept that academicians apply multiple definitions. The term has
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