Archives

30Apr2020

The Bee Gees are back!

  • By Ian Bradley
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Just before nodding off to sleep last night my wife turned over and asked me: “are you happy?” As with most men hearing this question, instant alarm bells went off.  With later elaboration, what she really meant was, now during this weird, self-isolating, social-distancing Covid 19 time, was I happy?   It got me thinking
20Apr2020

Developing New Habits

  • By Ian Bradley
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Good habits are great, they function like automatic algorithms that silently function in the background to help us engage in adaptive behaviour. Habits can not only propel us to good things that they do so automatically and without highly conscious and deliberate thought thus freeing our brains to do more complex things. Automatically buckling the
20Jan2019

Family Business Succession: conclusion

  • By Ian Bradley
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  Start Early As discussed in the previous post, most psychologists specializing in the area recommend thinking about succession as a long-term process rather than as a defined event, or worse, an anointment. Some even recommend that the process begin years before the actual succession. Ironically, long-term thinking does occur, perhaps as a father watching
30Aug2018

Peak Performance with Goal Setting

  • By Ian Bradley
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In my practice as a executive coach in Montreal, I am often confronted by clients who criticize themselves for lack of organizational skills.   “Why can’t I get this done?” or “I’m always behind”  and  “my to-do list never gets accomplished! “ are often common expressions of this malaise.   There are many excellent books
22Jul2014

Conflict (cont), Lessons in Management, Part VI

  • By Ian Bradley
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In my work as an executive coach who sees professionals in many different capacities, it has struck me that each professional has its own competitive angle. I remember counseling several mathematicians who explained to me that if you weren’t a genius, or perceived as one, you were by default mediocre. For litigation lawyers, it’s their
11Sep2013

What it takes to succeed: academic success

  • By Ian Bradley
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For the last three years, I had the dream of teaching assignments at McGill University.   The course content was perfectly aligned with my 40-years of clinical experience that ranged from running a treatment center with autistic children to directing a department of psychology in large Montreal teaching hospital.  Besides talking about something that I knew,
07Mar2013

Clinician comme Coach

  • By Ian Bradley
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Before specializing in executive coaching and workplace problems, I was a clinical psychologist with stints in mental hospitals and clinics in Los Angeles, Vancouver, Toronto as well as Montreal.  I worked extensively with both severely disturbed patients with diagnoses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder as well as more down-to-earth problems in living such as
11Dec2012

Ability to learn: what’s required in an executive?

  • By Ian Bradley
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For many of my clients, learning starts with a problem – not always a crisis but a problem that brings enough distress that they seek my services in executive coaching. Two all-stars of I/O Psychology, Bennis and Thomas have referred to these transforming events as ”crucibles.”  Perhaps like the chemistry crucible, one hopes that the
16Oct2012

A busy day: two scenarios

  • By Ian Bradley
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Many of the executives that I see in my Montreal practice for executive coaching talk about their hectic days.  As I listen to their stories, I am quietly asking myself a key question: Are they in some measure able to control the stream of tasks, or is the onslaught occurring without a filtration or buffering
09Oct2012

Working with “insurance” is stressful

  • By Ian Bradley
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“I’ll just run this by my boss” was a phrase that I heard all to frequently from my client who came to see about work-related stress.  Laura, a young woman in her first major corporate job, worked for a boss who micro-managed.   The boss, who did not like surprises, insisted upon being appraised about each
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