Archives

14Jul2014

Conflict: Personal Lessons in Management,Part V

  • By Ian Bradley
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Managing a department is a bit like being a therapist. You get to see a little bit of the inner world of the people you manage, but unlike therapy, you don’t get to bill for it. I remember the first time that a senior psychologist entered my office and started to cry. It was a
21Feb2014

Managing staff: Personal Lessons in Management; Part IV

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is a continuing series in an open letter to psychologists thinking about accepting that promotion to department or service director.  In previous posts I talked about the fantasies around promotion as well as the inherent organizational conflict that comes with being a middle manager, organizational change and today, dealing with staff.   As Chief
29Jan2014

Change; Personal Lessons in Management; Part III

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is a continuing series in an open letter to psychologists thinking about accepting that promotion to department or service director. In previous posts I talked about the fantasies around promotion as well as the inherent organizational conflict that comes with being a “middle manager.”  In today’s post, I talk about change.   The skills
14Jan2014

Being in the middle: Personal lessons in management, Part II

  • By Ian Bradley
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Welcome to a series of posts directed at young psychologists thinking about becoming managers.  Although I had a successful twenty-five year tenure as Chief Psychologist, I entered the position extremely unprepared for the managerial tasks I faced.  Hopefully, sharing my experiences will help others become better managers. In my first post I addressed the topic
06Jan2014

Memo to Young Psychologists: Beware of Promotions

  • By Ian Bradley
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The call came out of the blue from the secretary of a psychiatric director of a large and prestigious teaching hospital.  The director wanted to see if I would be interested in applying for the recently vacated position of Chief Psychologist.   I had been working in a small CBT unit of what once had
10Nov2013

Getting Ahead versus Getting Along

  • By Ian Bradley
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As a psychologist involved in helping professional athletes as well as senior executives, I have found numerous similarities in the challenges facing both groups. One such similarity is the dialectical tension of two  opposing tendencies – individual achievement and team playing. As students of philosophy appreciate, a dialectic represents a systematic reasoning process that attempts
03Oct2013

Job Success Part II

  • By Ian Bradley
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In this second post related to the theme of success, I would like to address success in the workplace.  As a Montreal-based executive coach and workplace counselor, I often hear something like: “I’m doing my job well, but I’m not getting promoted!” It’s the common refrain of technically competent people who accomplish their job tasks,
11Sep2013

Quebec’s Charter of Values: a needless distraction

  • By Ian Bradley
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Buried in the cacophony of noise concerning Quebec’s Charter of Values was a story about the median family income of Quebecers versus the national average.  The 2010 census data tells a sad story that the provincial average was 11% below the national average, and 26.8% below that of the average Albertan family.  Meanwhile we like
11Sep2013

What it takes to succeed: academic success

  • By Ian Bradley
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For the last three years, I had the dream of teaching assignments at McGill University.   The course content was perfectly aligned with my 40-years of clinical experience that ranged from running a treatment center with autistic children to directing a department of psychology in large Montreal teaching hospital.  Besides talking about something that I knew,
02Aug2013

Never say a test is valid, (conclusion)

  • By Ian Bradley
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I my previous post, I recalled a recent professional interaction where a research proposal claimed that a particular test was valid. The evidence cited to support this claim was defined in the original study of the test’s development.  I pointed out that the phrase; “the test is valid” although commonly used is psychometrically incorrect. Firstly,
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