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25Aug2014

Ethics ( cont ); Lessons in Management, Part VIII

  • By Ian Bradley
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In my previous post, I described the organizational structure that allowed our hospital’s department of psychology to develop and manage mental health programs that directly served the public. These were delivered directly by psychologists working in the Department of Psychology and not on multidisciplinary team. I also outlined the threats to the maintenance of this
13Aug2014

Ethics, Lessons in Management, Part VII

  • By Ian Bradley
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I just finished reading yet another journal issue replete with articles about ethics in psychology. The more I read the more disheartened I became, for I fear that rather than enriching our profession, the current zealous promotion of ethics only ties our hands and restricts our professional creativity.
22Jul2014

Conflict (cont), Lessons in Management, Part VI

  • By Ian Bradley
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In my work as an executive coach who sees professionals in many different capacities, it has struck me that each professional has its own competitive angle. I remember counseling several mathematicians who explained to me that if you weren’t a genius, or perceived as one, you were by default mediocre. For litigation lawyers, it’s their
14Jul2014

Conflict: Personal Lessons in Management,Part V

  • By Ian Bradley
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Managing a department is a bit like being a therapist. You get to see a little bit of the inner world of the people you manage, but unlike therapy, you don’t get to bill for it. I remember the first time that a senior psychologist entered my office and started to cry. It was a
21Feb2014

Managing staff: Personal Lessons in Management; Part IV

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is a continuing series in an open letter to psychologists thinking about accepting that promotion to department or service director.  In previous posts I talked about the fantasies around promotion as well as the inherent organizational conflict that comes with being a middle manager, organizational change and today, dealing with staff.   As Chief
29Jan2014

Change; Personal Lessons in Management; Part III

  • By Ian Bradley
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This is a continuing series in an open letter to psychologists thinking about accepting that promotion to department or service director. In previous posts I talked about the fantasies around promotion as well as the inherent organizational conflict that comes with being a “middle manager.”  In today’s post, I talk about change.   The skills
14Jan2014

Being in the middle: Personal lessons in management, Part II

  • By Ian Bradley
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Welcome to a series of posts directed at young psychologists thinking about becoming managers.  Although I had a successful twenty-five year tenure as Chief Psychologist, I entered the position extremely unprepared for the managerial tasks I faced.  Hopefully, sharing my experiences will help others become better managers. In my first post I addressed the topic
06Jan2014

Memo to Young Psychologists: Beware of Promotions

  • By Ian Bradley
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The call came out of the blue from the secretary of a psychiatric director of a large and prestigious teaching hospital.  The director wanted to see if I would be interested in applying for the recently vacated position of Chief Psychologist.   I had been working in a small CBT unit of what once had
10Nov2013

Getting Ahead versus Getting Along

  • By Ian Bradley
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As a psychologist involved in helping professional athletes as well as senior executives, I have found numerous similarities in the challenges facing both groups. One such similarity is the dialectical tension of two  opposing tendencies – individual achievement and team playing. As students of philosophy appreciate, a dialectic represents a systematic reasoning process that attempts
03Oct2013

Job Success Part II

  • By Ian Bradley
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In this second post related to the theme of success, I would like to address success in the workplace.  As a Montreal-based executive coach and workplace counselor, I often hear something like: “I’m doing my job well, but I’m not getting promoted!” It’s the common refrain of technically competent people who accomplish their job tasks,
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